Dedicated to including all people living in the Yukon in every walk of life.

 
 
 

Mission

“To promote meaningful inclusion for people with intellectual disabilities and their families into all aspects of community life by providing advocacy, public awareness and education, community capacity development, and program support.”

We consider intellectual impairment or developmental delay as part of life’s diversity, and a component of community to be included rather than excluded or hidden.  We seek to promote inclusion for individuals and families by finding ways to educate the public, inform professionals, and develop services and strategies. We also work in partnership with parents, government and other community agencies to provide opportunities for everyone to reach their potential and feel like they belong.


 

Goals

01.

public awareness and education

To increase public awareness/education about the goals and values of Inclusion Yukon and CACL with emphasis on inclusion, available programs, resources and services.


02.

advocacy

To advocate in the best interests of people with intellectual disabilities and their families.


03.

partnering

To further develop and maintain working relationships with families, relevant government departments and non-government organizations and public service agencies.

04.

nationally affiliated

To develop, maintain and strengthen our national affiliation with the CACL, Roeher Institute (now IRIS) and the provincial chapters of the CACL.

 
 
 
 

“There is no greater disability in society than than the inability to see a person as more.”

robert M. Hensel

 
 
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History

Since 1964…

Inclusion Yukon is a registered non-profit organization with charitable tax status. We recently changed our name from Yukon Association for Community Living to follow the trend of our partner organisations across Canada and also to be clearer about our purpose as a society in the Yukon.

The Association began in March 1964 when the then Yukon Social Services Society organized a group to develop programs to assist “Yukon’s mentally retarded children and develop facilities in the territory”.  As a result the Yukon Association for Retarded Children was incorporated on October 5, 1964.

Over the years, coalitions were built with Yukon Special Olympics and Learning Disabilities Association of Yukon. This umbrella organization was called Yukon Association for Special Needs People.  However, as each group became more focused, there was a need to establish an autonomous organization that concentrated on community living for people labeled mentally disabled.

We changed our name to the current one in April 1988 to be consistent with the philosophy and name of our affiliate the Canadian Association for Community Living. The title at the national level was changed through a demonstration by people with intellectual disabilities who felt that the old labels were derogatory and demeaning.

Over the years, our staff, board and membership have built a substantial base of knowledge and expertise.  YACL has spearheaded research studies on such topics as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, childcare, respite care, guardianship/supported decision making, and the relationship between substance abuse and disability.

In addition, Inclusion Yukon has been instrumental in the establishment of: the Child Development Centre, Challenge Community Vocational Alternatives, integrated recreational programs, Teegatha ‘oh Zheh (residential service), Options for Independence, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Society Yukon, People First Society of Yukon and housed the Snoezelen Room for several years. We played an important advocacy and consultancy role in development and review of the Yukon Education Act and the Yukon College development of the Child Care Training Project.



 
 
 

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